Colors: Cyan Color

By the time this article is published, the Presidency of Donald J. Trump will be over. For many on the conservative Right, whether they agreed or disagreed with Trump on a variety of issues, this is the end of federal conservative policies for at least two years, likely longer. Many articles were written last week that the American Orthodox Jewish community needs to reckon with its support for the President. This is not necessary, as Trump’s successes need not be forgiven, and his failures need not be apologized for by his voters.

An Orthodox Jew looks at his community, post-Trump

As a proud member of the Orthodox community – one increasingly embarrassed by the behavior of a large part of our community – I take pride in our openness to asking challenging questions. The question-and-answer format of the Talmud. The give-and-take of a beis midrash study hall. The no-holds-barred approach of students towards a rabbi’s Torah lecture.

 New York Times bestselling author Governor Andrew Cuomo, who literally wrote the book on how to defeat COVID, is a blight on this once-great state.  That’s it.  That’s the article.

 January 6, 2021, should be remembered as one of the darkest days in American history. It was a day where extremists stormed the United States Capitol in an attempt to force Congress to overturn the results of an election. Democrats, media, Big Tech, and others are placing the blame solely on President Trump. The House of Representatives introduced Articles of Impeachment for Inciting an Insurrection, even though Trump will be out of office in less than two weeks. Despite the narrative, this event, like other dark moments, did not occur without months, even years, of build-up.

Just about two weeks ago, around mid-December 2020, the 50th anniversary of the Leningrad trial was marked. The Leningrad trial involved eleven individuals, mostly Jews, who stood trial for attempting to carry out the hijacking of a small empty airplane in June 1970. It was a fantasy; under the disguise of a trip to a local wedding, the hijackers would buy every ticket on a 12-seater plane, so there would be no passengers but them.  Their plan was to board the empty 12-seat plane from inside the Soviet Union, in an effort to escape the USSR by landing the airplane in Sweden.  Later on, this story was dubbed Operation Wedding.