Colors: Green Color

Many of us would not consider ourselves political individuals and do not put going to the polls on our list of priorities. Nonetheless, casting your ballot gives you a voice on issues ranging from housing and education to employment and healthcare. Being involved in the voting process allows you make a real difference in the makeup and decisions within your community. Casting a vote has dire consequences for the quality of life that both you and your family experience today and in the years ahead. From riding the bus or train to raising minimum wage to getting better textbooks in school, your vote decides how these issues will play out. Casting your ballot affords you the opportunity to delegate how your hard-earned tax dollars are divvied out for necessities like medical expenses and social services that many take for granted.

Now that we have celebrated Purim with its chagigos, Purim shpiels, and all the hooplahs, it’s time for a reality check and thinking about Pesach. Each year, the celebration of the holiday gets more and more expensive. Our Rabbis state that our celebration for Pesach is incomplete if we fail to provide for those in need in our community. They further teach us that we are truly G-dly in our behavior when we actively respond to the poor and vulnerable. Caring for and giving to those less fortunate is our righteous obligation, responsibility, and duty. The chiyuv (obligation) to combat poverty is meant to be an expression of our achdus (unity) as a people. The giving of charity is a fundamental part of Jewish life.

Everyone is congratulating Bibi Netanyahu on his victory in the recent Israeli elections. President Biden called him, and the world is getting ready for another term of Netanyahu as Prime Minister. There’s only one problem: Contrary to what everyone is saying and everything you are reading, Bibi did not win these elections! Think I’m crazy? (Don’t answer that!) Allow me to explain.

By the time you read this, we may well know the result of the Special Election for the City Council. But if you think there will be a respite from politics, guess again. The big election this year will be the Primary on June 22. The winner has already started running for re-election and potential opponents are already gearing up. They will start collecting signatures to get on the ballot in less than three weeks.

Israelis head to the polls next week (Tuesday, November 1) for the fifth time since 2019. Many people have asked me why this happens, and my answer is always the same: Israelis just want a day off! Election Day in Israel is similar to the one thing I miss about life in America: Sunday! No work, no school – just a day to spend with the family. Since the act of voting takes less than ten minutes, which includes schmoozing with friends on the voting line and yelling at the leftists who are campaigning to destroy the country, a whole day is left to enjoy with the kids and grandkids.